Fall Has Arrived

Even though fall arrived on Sunday in Seattle with rain, wind, and cooler temperatures, serveral clematis were still showing their wares.  Some even starred in beautiful  autumn floral combinations!

Clematis My Angel (rumored to be a thug)

Clematis My Angel (rumored to be a thug)

A Digression

But first, let me digress about a recent sighting of Clematis My Angel.   A month ago or so, my husband and I took a weekend jaunt to the quaint Victorian town of Port Townsend on the Olympic peninsula here in Washington State.  We enjoyed a great lunch one day outdoors on the patio of a little neighborhood restaurant. Several houses, including the restaurant (which had been a house in an earlier life), had yards that butted up against each other with a wide and winding semi-public pathway in-between. As we were eating, my eagle clematis eye recognized that an unfamiliar clematis was cloaking an arbor about 30′ away, so quite naturally I had to investigate.  It was Clematis My Angel, a hybrid of Clematis orientalis var orientalis and Clematis intricata, raised by Wim Snoeijer of the Dutch nursery Jan van Zoest. It’s a lovely clematis that blooms in August and has great seedheads.  I, however, have steered clear of it because of rumors that it can sometimes become invasive, not only reseeding but also running underground. It’s lovely, though, with nodding bronzy-purple buds that open to show off yellow undersides with brown stamens.  Hmm, maybe I DO need this one, after all. 

Way Too Many Clematis Need Planting

Sunday I managed to plant eight of the twenty-four clematis that have somehow showed up in my potting area.  Then, today, I upgraded four to larger  pots–too young or too small to plant out yet.  Because the eight clematis I managed to get planted this weekend are new to me, I have no photos of my own.  But you can check out the links below to Clematis on the Web to see what they look like.  All but one of these will join three or four others on the back fence of my property – and grow through to the alley-where they can WOW alley strollers and dog walkers!

Clematis Happy Birthday

Clematis Mrs. Cholmondeley (pronounced Chumley)

Clematis Multi Blue

Clematis Omoshiro

Clematis Rebecca

Clematis tibetana subsp vernayi var laciniifolia

Clematis Vitiwester

Also planted, but in a place seen from inside the garden:

Clematis tibetana (black form) (should look similar to the one at this link)

A Sampling of my September Bloomers

One of the most lovely clematis blooming in my garden now is Clematis florida sieboldii next to my front steps.  I have enjoyed the one in my back garden so much that I got one last spring for the front .  It bloomed beautifully for me in June, but then collapsed to the ground (wilt?  broken stem? something else?  who knows?).  So I had to cut it to the ground – then, lo and behold, it grew a new stem and is blooming again in September!  Gotta love that clem!  

Clematis florida sieboldii (in my front garden)

Clematis florida sieboldii (in my front garden)

Madame Baron Veillard is still throwing its welcome late blooms.

Clematis Madame Baron Veillard

Clematis Madame Baron Veillard

Even Betty Corning has put out a couple of new blossoms for my enjoyment.

Clematis Betty Corning

Clematis Betty Corning

And Clematis Sizaia Ptitsa, which has been blooming for months, is still sending out new flowers.

Clematis Sizaia Ptitsa, still going strong

Clematis Sizaia Ptitsa, still going strong

Clematis Etoile de Malicorne, a June bloomer, showed off with a late and lovely blossom.

Clematis Etoile de Malicorne

Clematis Etoile de Malicorne

Nearby Clematis Ville de Lyon is blooming with the black berries of a Hypericum.

Clematis Ville de Lyon

Clematis Ville de Lyon

My Clematis terniflora (Sweet Autumn Clematis) is loaded down with buds and should burst into fragrant bloom any day now.  Though Sweet Autumn Clematis blooms for me here in Seattle in late September and early October, when I grew it in Boston (much much more heat), it would bloom for me from August to October!  But even with a shorter season here in Seattle, I wouldn’t be without it.

Multitudes of Buds on Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis terniflora)

Multitudes of Buds on Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis terniflora)

Great Autumn Clematis Combos

Late blooms of Clematis Margot Koster spontaneously color-coordinated itself with a Pee Gee Hydrangea.

Clematis Margot Koster

Clematis Margot Koster

Clematis Rooguchi Making a Comeback with Rudbekia Goldsturm.

Clematis Rooguchi

Clematis Rooguchi

As promised, here is a photo of my Clematis viorna cavorting with the beautiful lavender fruit of Beauty Berry (Calicarpa).

Clematis viorna with the lavender berries of Beauty Berry

Clematis viorna with the lavender berries of Beauty Berry

Two More Sweet Little Bells

Here’s a photo of a cute hybrid of Clematis pitcheri from the southeastern US.

Clematis pitcheri hybrid on a Ceonothus.

Clematis pitcheri hybrid on a Ceonothus.

A  Japanese hybrid, Clematis Hakuju has dainty white bells that bloom off and on all summer for me with the black leaves of a dark Actea (formerly Cimicifuga) and the clear green leaves and white flowers of Nicotiana sylvestrus.

Clematis Hakuju with a dark-leaved Actea (aka Cimicifuga)

Clematis Hakuju with a dark-leaved Actea (aka Cimicifuga)

What’s blooming in YOUR garden?

 

Clematis in Germany and Holland, Part 2

Clematis in Germany & Holland, Part 2

This is Part 2 of a four-part description of my experiences at the International Clematis Society’s Conference in Southern Germany this past summer, including a pre-trip to Heidelberg and a post-trip to Holland. If you haven’t already read Part 1, you might want to go back and read that first (check category:  International Clematis Conference).

Würzburg

On our third day in the charming clematis village of Erlabrunn, we spent the morning walking around the village and enjoying all the beautiful clematis planted everywhere for our enjoyment. In the afternoon, we were off on a little river cruise to nearby Würzburg where we saw the Fortress Marienberg, with a beautiful view of Würzburg and its surroundings. On view were innumerable steep fields full of grape vines growing in neat rows – this area is afterall in the heart of Germany’s wine country. Then we visited the Würzburg Residence, a sumptuous palace built for a bishop in the 1700s. The central main hall of the residence is large enough for carriages with teams of six horses to drive into so the elite passengers would not have to disembark outside in the elements!

The Wurzburg Residence

The Wurzburg Residence

In the evening we were treated to a wine tasting in the Würzburg Residence wine cellar – very healthy tastes of six delicious local wines. The wine cellar still shows off casks that are hundreds of years old, but of course they use newer ones to make today’s wines. Afterwards, the chatty giggly group boarded a bus to head back to Erlabrunn.

The Wine Cellar

The Wine Cellar

The Village of Uettingen

The next morning, we packed up to head for Ludwigsburg near Stuttgart. On the way we made a little detour to the village of Uettingen, where we were enchanted by two lovely gardens, each one very different from the other.

Garden of Corinna Seubert-Korhman

Garden Dreams, the garden of Corinna Seubert-Kohrman, is beautifully laid out into garden rooms with carefully orchestrated color schemes and embellished with Corinna’s garden accessories. Views from one garden to another lead the eye through complex layers of texture and color, often to one of the many focal points that grace the garden. Corinna and her husband Frank purchased the run-down property twenty years ago and have transformed it into a showpiece, with Frank restoring the house and other buildings and Corinna establishing the garden. Corinna loves to use a wide range of garden accessories, planters, trellises, and outdoor furniture of extraordinary style in her gardens and offers many of these items for sale in her showroom.

Deft Use of Color & Texture

Deft Use of Color & Texture

A View from One Garden Room into Others

A View from One Garden Room into Others

Garden Accessories

Garden Accessories

Our group of clematarians (aka clemaniacs) included several clematis hybridizers. Two of them, Manfred Westphal of Clematisculturen Westphal in Germany and Szczepan Marczynski of Clematis-Container Nursery in Poland, spent several minutes standing before a large clematis loaded with pale blue blossoms discussing whether the plant could be Clematis Prince Charles or not. They finally concluded that the plant was a C. Prince Charles look-alike, not the real thing.   Unfortunately, the bright sunny day made getting good photos a bit difficult.

Faux C. Prince Charles in Question

Faux C. Prince Charles in Question

Manfred and Szczepan discussing the authenticity of C. Prince Charles

Manfred and Szczepan discussing the authenticity of C. Prince Charles

 The Garden of Marianne and Peter Kraus

The second garden in Uettingen, the creation of Marianne and Peter Kraus, also is made up of a series of garden rooms, each one with its own aura and all chock full of wonderful perennials, annuals, climbing roses, and clematis, many of them rare or unusual. My Russian friend Valentina, a rosarian as well as a clematarian, was in heaven! She was particularly delighted to see the antique blue-toned rambler Rosa Vielchenblau in full bloom. Only when it was nearly time to go did I discover that I had seen only half of the garden! It was on a double lot with a tall clipped hedge separating (or in my case – hiding) the second garden from the first. I had very little time to take in all there was to see on the other side of the hedge!

Gardener Marianna with Lothar (Germany), Iris (England), and Klaus Korber (Erlabrunn)

Gardener Marianne with Lothar (Germany), Iris (England), and Klaus Korber (Erlabrunn)

The Dusky and Alluring Clematis Romantika

The Dusky and Alluring Clematis Romantika

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa (I think)

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa (I think)

Clematis durundii

Clematis durundii

Clematis The President

Clematis The President

Attendees Carol (England) and Crystal (Germany) resting in the shade

Attendees Carol (England) and Crystal (Germany) resting in the shade

Klaus Kölle

Next stop on our way to Ludwigsburg was the Gartencenter Kölle in Heilbronn (one of several upscale and very successful Kölle garden centers around Germany). Owner Klaus Kölle was there to greet us and offer us an outstanding outdoor luncheon, after which we were all treated to tours of the bowels of the nursery business – way in the back where all the plants are grown for market. Then off we went to the large and gorgeous home garden of Klaus Kölle and his wife – auf dem Äckerle (which means On the Little Farm). This garden was utterly unbelievable. Huge with a lawn down the middle and deep deep borders all around, loaded with gorgeous plants, including many beautiful clematis, and showcasing vistas into the valleys and hills beyond.  An absolutely jaw-dropping stunning garden. And we had the great honor of being able to lounge about in it imbibing cool drinks and taking in the atmosphere.

Klaus Kolle and Daughter Welcoming the International Clematis Society

Klaus Kolle and Daughter Welcoming the International Clematis Society

Just a portion (maybe 1/3) of the beautiful Kolle garden.

Just a portion (maybe 1/3) of the beautiful Kolle garden.

Eye-Catching Unknown Clematis

Eye-Catching Unknown Clematis

Clematis Justa

Clematis Justa

Purple Clematis with Yellow Rose -- Wonderful Combination!

Purple Clematis with Yellow Rose — Wonderful Combination!

Clematis Julii?

Clematis Julii?

 Ludwigsburg

In Ludwigsburg we had yet another palace to see.  I chose, instead, to go with two friends across the street to spend the day checking out  Ludwigsburg’s shops and cafes.

SchlossLudwigsburgInnenhof

The Garden of Elke and Friedrich Schmid

In the afternoon we traveled a short way by bus to the garden of Elke and Friedrich Schmid. This garden had loads of clematis in bloom, many of them held up by interesting natural supports. Though the weather was damp, we were undeterred. I think each one of us checked out every clematis on the property, plus many other interesting plants. Herr Schmid’s grandchildren, who have lived in the US for several years, were on hand to translate for their grandfather to those of us who speak English better than German.

Clematis on a Tripod Made of Natural Materials

Clematis on a Tripod Made of Natural Materials

Clematis Rooguchi

Clematis Rooguchi

Clematis Royal Velours

Clematis Royal Velours

Clematis Tie Dye

Clematis Tie Dye

Clematis Nelly Moser (or a look alike) Gracing a Dark-Leaved Maple Tree

Clematis Nelly Moser (or a look alike) Gracing a Dark-Leaved Maple Tree

Clematis Blue Angel Adorning a Conifer

Clematis Blue Angel Adorning a Conifer

Unknown Red Clematis

Unknown Red Clematis

The Ever-Beautiful Clematis Venosa Violacea

The Ever-Beautiful Clematis Venosa Violacea

That evening we were treated to another wonderful wine tasting, this time with nine wines, at the Bottwartaler Vinery – a much newer and more modern winery that the one in Wurzburg.  We were able to purchase wines there, and a couple of bottles flew home with me to the US.

Clematis in Germany and Holland, Parts 3 and 4, Still to Come  

Hmm, looks like I’ll have to report on my clematis activities in Europe this summer in four parts instead of two or three.  Part 3 will describe more activities in Germany, including another display garden, two more clematis gardens, and a clematis and rose festival in Unterleitzheim that occurs only once every three years.  Part 4 will cover the time I spent in Holland with wonderful friends who have a beautiful garden. I will also describe a visit to Ton Hannick’s propagation greenhouse and a trip to Boskoop to see two nurseries specializing in clematis.  So be sure to check back!

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