Clematis in Germany and Holland, Part 3

Below (finally!) is Part 3 of my impressions of the International Clematis Conference in Southern Germany in late June and early July of 2013.  If you would like to read Parts 1 and 2, please go to Categories on the left, click on International Clematis Conference 2013.

Das Haus der Guten Dinge and the University of Hohenheim Arboretum

My Lost Topiary Shears.

My Lost Topiary Shears.

After visiting Ludwigsburg near Stuttgart, the International Clematis Society group headed in the direction of Neu-Ulm, but made a few stops along the way.

First up was the Haus der Guten Dinge (House of Good Things), an entrancing shop offering a countless variety of wonderful garden accessories, from pots to statuary to garden furniture.  We wondered through several courtyards and indoor spaces all artfully arranged with loads of Dinge!  I found a small pottery bird I liked, which I managed to get home safely.  The pair of special topiary shears (resting in the wire basket in this photo) that I planned to use on my one little squirrel topiary did not fair so well.  I foolishly forgot to move them from my carry on to my checked luggage, and they were confiscated by airport personnel in Amsterdam.  Oh, so sad.   I hope I will never make that mistake again!

The group went on the Arboretum at the University of Hohenheim where we listened to a talk on special organic fertilizers, after which our bus driver treated us to a traditional lunch of sausage sandwiches that he prepared himself.  The more energetic among us also took a guided tour of the historic arboretum maintained at the University of Hohenheim.  This arboretum is especially known for large and beautiful specimens of American trees that are over 200 years old, including oak, buckeye, and tulip trees.

Gisela and Walter's Roof Garden

Gisela and Walter’s Roof Garden

Garden of Gisela and Walter Stabler

Our afternoon stop was the pièce de résistance of the day — actually, one of the major highlights of the entire trip!  Gisela and Walter are long-time members of the International Clematis Society and have attended many of the society’s international conferences, always buying clematis along the way.  Immediately upon arriving in front of their home in the bus, we all knew that this would be a fabulous garden.  Just take a gander at the roof-top garden over the garages — it even has a small pond!  After walking through the gardens along the side of the house, we entered the back garden where we were astounded.  Loads of clematis throughout the garden were gracing many unusual specimen plants, as well as arbors, trellises, pergolas, and pillars.  Everywhere one looked was another surprise.  One of the biggest surprises was that they had purchased a second lot in the back and filled that one, too.

Gisela and Walter traveled with our group for the first few days of the trip, but then had to leave to return home to prepare for our visit.  When we arrived, we were treated not only to a lovely garden, but also to coffee and tea, accompanied by huge and delicious cakes slathered with glistening fruit.  I was too busy sampling the wares to remember to take photos of them.  We all wanted to stay forever.  The one downside of the afternoon occurred when our revered new president, fellow Pacific Northwesterner Linda Beutler somehow managed to coerce me to singing America the Beautiful with her in celebration of the Fourth of July — even though I can’t sing a lick.  Geesh, embarrassing.  Enjoy the photos below of the beautiful and well-loved Stabler garden.

Another Shot of the Roof Garden

Another Shot of the Roof Garden

Unknown C. viticella on a pillar..

Unknown C. viticella on a pillar

Members of the Society Enjoying the Garden

Members of the Society Enjoying the Garden

Clematis venosa violacea

Clematis Venosa Violacea

What a Pergola and Patio Combination!

What a Pergola and Patio Combination!

Another Clematis viticella

Another Clematis viticella

Dieter Gaissmayer Perennial Nursery and Display Garden, plus Museum

We kicked off the next day with a visit to the very interesting Perennial Nursery and Display Garden of Dieter Gaissmayer.   Adjacent to the display and sales areas is the Garden Museum.  Interesting antique gardening memorabilia were on show there, including old seed advertisements, antique bell jars, old tools, and a plethora of heirloom bean seeds.

A Display of Heirloom Beans

A Display of Heirloom Beans

Small historic outbuilding, restored and placed on the grounds.

Small historic outbuilding, restored and placed on the grounds.

Sales Area -- check out those delphiniums!

Sales Area — check out those delphiniums!

Below are a couple of quirky and inspiring structures with great potential for clematis!

Oh, can't you just envision eight or ten clematis dripping on this one?

Oh, can’t you just envision eight or ten clematis cascading off of this one?

 

A good one for short clematis maybe?

A good one for short clematis maybe?

Side Trip to Two Gardens in Hoch Bayerische

The two gardens we were originally scheduled to visit in the afternoon had been flooded in bad rains southern Germany experienced earlier in the spring.  Instead, we visited two charming southern Bavarian gardens in the foothills of the Alps.  Both gardens had clematis on show.

Large Clematis tanguitica draped over the deck and wall.

Large Clematis tanguitica draped over the deck and wall.

Close-Up of C. tanguitica

Close-Up of C. tanguitica

 

Unknown clematis

Unknown clematis

Clematis Ville de Leon

Clematis Ville de Leon

On our way back to our hotel in the late afternoon, we stopped in the city of Ulm for a short visit.  Some of us stopped for ice cream and did a little bit of shopping.   I got a pair of cool green sunglasses.  Others visited the large gothic church, called the Ulm Minster.  Then back to the hotel in Neu-Ulm for dinner and REST!

Downtown Ulm

Downtown Ulm with Ulm Minster in the background

 

The Rose and Clematis Festival wrapped itself all around the Unterleitzheim church

The Rose and Clematis Festival wrapped itself all around the Unterleitzheim church

Last Day

On the final full day of the conference, we all packed up and loaded the bus with our things again.  On schedule for the day was a visit to the small village of Unterleitzheim to attend the renowned Rose and Clematis Festival, which happens only every three years and draws loads of visitors from near and far (including us!).   The festival was packed with people and flowers!  We all went off in different directions, running into each other again here and there.  We wandered around drinking in all the beautiful clematis and roses in bloom.  Many of my European friends purchased luscious clematis plants that were available from the many vendors — not so for me, alas.  I had no permit to import plants.  To soothe my unrequited clematis lust, I bought a handcrafted necklace and a pair earrings.

Lunch was available at the Festival — I enjoyed a relaxing outdoor meal and some leisurely people watching.

See below just a few of the lovely clematis at the Festival.

 

Clematis Princess Diana on display

Clematis ‘Princess Diana’ on display

First time I laid eyes on Clematis connata in bloom

First time I ever laid eyes on Clematis connata in bloom

Clematis texensis species

Clematis texensis species

Another version of the Clematis texensis species

Another Clematis texensis species

Clematis hendersonii

Clematis x diversifolia Hendersonii

 

Clematis in Van Zost display

Clematis in Van Zoest display (possibly Clematis Mississippi River)

Also at the festival, our own Ton Hannink (president at the time of the International Clematis Society) presented two new clematis named for the daughters of the hybridizer.  You can see them both below (the daughters and the clematis), with Ton on the left.

Two clematis named for the two daughters of the hybridizer!

Two clematis named for the two daughters of the hybridizer!

In the afternoon, we left Unterleitzheim for a long drive back to where the conference had begun a week earlier in Erlabrunn, the Village with Clematis Fever.  Here on the last night of the conference we enjoyed a gala dinner and began all the long goodbyes to our clematis friends.  During the dinner Klaus Korber (a former President of the society and one of the organizers of the trip) performed jazz music for us again.  The week before he and his long-time friends in the village, who have played together for many years, had serenaded us in his garden — see photo below.

Klaus Korber (2nd from right) and friends

Klaus Korber (2nd from right) and friends

 

Gala Dinner on the last night of the conference

Gala Dinner on the last night of the conference with Klaus performing

Me (on the left) with my friends Crystal from Germany (center) and Valentina from Russia (right)

Me (on the left) with my friends Crystal from Germany (center) and Valentina from Russia (right)

Me again, with multi-cultural friends from Russia, Poland, Germany, and Sweden

Me again, with multi-cultural friends from Russia, Poland, Germany, and Sweden

The following morning after breakfast we all went our separate ways.
We hope to meet again at the
2014 International Clematis Conference in June in Philadelphia!
I know I’ll be there.

Clematis in Germany and Holland, Part 2

Clematis in Germany & Holland, Part 2

This is Part 2 of a four-part description of my experiences at the International Clematis Society’s Conference in Southern Germany this past summer, including a pre-trip to Heidelberg and a post-trip to Holland. If you haven’t already read Part 1, you might want to go back and read that first (check category:  International Clematis Conference).

Würzburg

On our third day in the charming clematis village of Erlabrunn, we spent the morning walking around the village and enjoying all the beautiful clematis planted everywhere for our enjoyment. In the afternoon, we were off on a little river cruise to nearby Würzburg where we saw the Fortress Marienberg, with a beautiful view of Würzburg and its surroundings. On view were innumerable steep fields full of grape vines growing in neat rows – this area is afterall in the heart of Germany’s wine country. Then we visited the Würzburg Residence, a sumptuous palace built for a bishop in the 1700s. The central main hall of the residence is large enough for carriages with teams of six horses to drive into so the elite passengers would not have to disembark outside in the elements!

The Wurzburg Residence

The Wurzburg Residence

In the evening we were treated to a wine tasting in the Würzburg Residence wine cellar – very healthy tastes of six delicious local wines. The wine cellar still shows off casks that are hundreds of years old, but of course they use newer ones to make today’s wines. Afterwards, the chatty giggly group boarded a bus to head back to Erlabrunn.

The Wine Cellar

The Wine Cellar

The Village of Uettingen

The next morning, we packed up to head for Ludwigsburg near Stuttgart. On the way we made a little detour to the village of Uettingen, where we were enchanted by two lovely gardens, each one very different from the other.

Garden of Corinna Seubert-Korhman

Garden Dreams, the garden of Corinna Seubert-Kohrman, is beautifully laid out into garden rooms with carefully orchestrated color schemes and embellished with Corinna’s garden accessories. Views from one garden to another lead the eye through complex layers of texture and color, often to one of the many focal points that grace the garden. Corinna and her husband Frank purchased the run-down property twenty years ago and have transformed it into a showpiece, with Frank restoring the house and other buildings and Corinna establishing the garden. Corinna loves to use a wide range of garden accessories, planters, trellises, and outdoor furniture of extraordinary style in her gardens and offers many of these items for sale in her showroom.

Deft Use of Color & Texture

Deft Use of Color & Texture

A View from One Garden Room into Others

A View from One Garden Room into Others

Garden Accessories

Garden Accessories

Our group of clematarians (aka clemaniacs) included several clematis hybridizers. Two of them, Manfred Westphal of Clematisculturen Westphal in Germany and Szczepan Marczynski of Clematis-Container Nursery in Poland, spent several minutes standing before a large clematis loaded with pale blue blossoms discussing whether the plant could be Clematis Prince Charles or not. They finally concluded that the plant was a C. Prince Charles look-alike, not the real thing.   Unfortunately, the bright sunny day made getting good photos a bit difficult.

Faux C. Prince Charles in Question

Faux C. Prince Charles in Question

Manfred and Szczepan discussing the authenticity of C. Prince Charles

Manfred and Szczepan discussing the authenticity of C. Prince Charles

 The Garden of Marianne and Peter Kraus

The second garden in Uettingen, the creation of Marianne and Peter Kraus, also is made up of a series of garden rooms, each one with its own aura and all chock full of wonderful perennials, annuals, climbing roses, and clematis, many of them rare or unusual. My Russian friend Valentina, a rosarian as well as a clematarian, was in heaven! She was particularly delighted to see the antique blue-toned rambler Rosa Vielchenblau in full bloom. Only when it was nearly time to go did I discover that I had seen only half of the garden! It was on a double lot with a tall clipped hedge separating (or in my case – hiding) the second garden from the first. I had very little time to take in all there was to see on the other side of the hedge!

Gardener Marianna with Lothar (Germany), Iris (England), and Klaus Korber (Erlabrunn)

Gardener Marianne with Lothar (Germany), Iris (England), and Klaus Korber (Erlabrunn)

The Dusky and Alluring Clematis Romantika

The Dusky and Alluring Clematis Romantika

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa (I think)

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa (I think)

Clematis durundii

Clematis durundii

Clematis The President

Clematis The President

Attendees Carol (England) and Crystal (Germany) resting in the shade

Attendees Carol (England) and Crystal (Germany) resting in the shade

Klaus Kölle

Next stop on our way to Ludwigsburg was the Gartencenter Kölle in Heilbronn (one of several upscale and very successful Kölle garden centers around Germany). Owner Klaus Kölle was there to greet us and offer us an outstanding outdoor luncheon, after which we were all treated to tours of the bowels of the nursery business – way in the back where all the plants are grown for market. Then off we went to the large and gorgeous home garden of Klaus Kölle and his wife – auf dem Äckerle (which means On the Little Farm). This garden was utterly unbelievable. Huge with a lawn down the middle and deep deep borders all around, loaded with gorgeous plants, including many beautiful clematis, and showcasing vistas into the valleys and hills beyond.  An absolutely jaw-dropping stunning garden. And we had the great honor of being able to lounge about in it imbibing cool drinks and taking in the atmosphere.

Klaus Kolle and Daughter Welcoming the International Clematis Society

Klaus Kolle and Daughter Welcoming the International Clematis Society

Just a portion (maybe 1/3) of the beautiful Kolle garden.

Just a portion (maybe 1/3) of the beautiful Kolle garden.

Eye-Catching Unknown Clematis

Eye-Catching Unknown Clematis

Clematis Justa

Clematis Justa

Purple Clematis with Yellow Rose -- Wonderful Combination!

Purple Clematis with Yellow Rose — Wonderful Combination!

Clematis Julii?

Clematis Julii?

 Ludwigsburg

In Ludwigsburg we had yet another palace to see.  I chose, instead, to go with two friends across the street to spend the day checking out  Ludwigsburg’s shops and cafes.

SchlossLudwigsburgInnenhof

The Garden of Elke and Friedrich Schmid

In the afternoon we traveled a short way by bus to the garden of Elke and Friedrich Schmid. This garden had loads of clematis in bloom, many of them held up by interesting natural supports. Though the weather was damp, we were undeterred. I think each one of us checked out every clematis on the property, plus many other interesting plants. Herr Schmid’s grandchildren, who have lived in the US for several years, were on hand to translate for their grandfather to those of us who speak English better than German.

Clematis on a Tripod Made of Natural Materials

Clematis on a Tripod Made of Natural Materials

Clematis Rooguchi

Clematis Rooguchi

Clematis Royal Velours

Clematis Royal Velours

Clematis Tie Dye

Clematis Tie Dye

Clematis Nelly Moser (or a look alike) Gracing a Dark-Leaved Maple Tree

Clematis Nelly Moser (or a look alike) Gracing a Dark-Leaved Maple Tree

Clematis Blue Angel Adorning a Conifer

Clematis Blue Angel Adorning a Conifer

Unknown Red Clematis

Unknown Red Clematis

The Ever-Beautiful Clematis Venosa Violacea

The Ever-Beautiful Clematis Venosa Violacea

That evening we were treated to another wonderful wine tasting, this time with nine wines, at the Bottwartaler Vinery – a much newer and more modern winery that the one in Wurzburg.  We were able to purchase wines there, and a couple of bottles flew home with me to the US.

Clematis in Germany and Holland, Parts 3 and 4, Still to Come  

Hmm, looks like I’ll have to report on my clematis activities in Europe this summer in four parts instead of two or three.  Part 3 will describe more activities in Germany, including another display garden, two more clematis gardens, and a clematis and rose festival in Unterleitzheim that occurs only once every three years.  Part 4 will cover the time I spent in Holland with wonderful friends who have a beautiful garden. I will also describe a visit to Ton Hannick’s propagation greenhouse and a trip to Boskoop to see two nurseries specializing in clematis.  So be sure to check back!

Clematis in Germany & Holland, Part 1

Clematis in Germany & Holland, Part 1

Recently, in late June and early July, I was privileged to attend the 2013 conference of the International Clematis Society in southern Germany, mostly Bavaria, with about 60 other clematarians from around the world. What a fabulous time! And, oh, my heavens, such a plethora of beautiful clematis we saw — some of which are not yet available in the US.

Just prior to the conference, I took a little jaunt to Heidelberg where eons ago, when I was a sweet young thing, I attended the University of Heidelberg for two years. I didn’t see any clematis there this time around, but I enjoyed seeing the lovely old city again–still looking much the same after all these years (unlike myself).

Old Heidelberg

Old Heidelberg

The Village of Erlabrunn

The International Clematis Conference began in the small and beautiful village of Erlabrunn just north of Wurzburg.  Erlabrunn boasts about 200-300 inhabitants and is the home village of one of the organizers of this year’s conference, Klaus Korber.  Klaus is a past president of the society and the current director of the nearby Orchard, Trees and Garden Department of the Bavarian State Institution for Wine-Growing and Horticulture (LWG for short).  The village of Erlabrunn decked itself out in 800 clematis (planted in 2008)  in honor of the 2013 visit of the  International Clematis Society!   Wunderbar!

Erlabrunn, a Clematis Village

Erlabrunn, a village with Clematis fever!

Bear with me as I show you photos of just a few of the 800 clematis on view as we strolled around the village.  Please forgive the quality of some of the photos — we were often out and about in the heat of the day, which is definitely not the best time for photography!

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa

Clematis Pamiat Serdtsa

Clematis Royal Velours

Clematis Royal Velours

Unknown Erlabrunn Clematis

Unknown Erlabrunn Clematis

Clematis Alba Plena

Clematis Alba Plena

Clematis Minuet

Clematis integrifolia Alba

Clematis integrifolia Alba

Clematis Piilu

Clematis Piilu

Clematis florida Sieboldii

Clematis florida Sieboldii

Unknown pale blue clematis

Unknown pale blue clematis

Lovely unknown clematis in a pot

Another unknown clematis in a pot

Nice Pairing!

Nice Pairing!

Clematis Princess Diana

Clematis Princess Diana

Lavendar clematis gracing a pot

Lavender clematis gracing a pot

Clematis Romantika

Clematis Romantika

Clematis Utopia?  or is it Clematis Omoshiru?  or maybe Clematis Fond Memories?  Whichever it is, I want all three.

Clematis Utopia? or is it Clematis Omoshiru? or maybe Clematis Fond Memories? Whichever it is, I want all three.

Clematis Hagley Hybrid\

Clematis Hagley Hybrid\

Clematis The President? with a peachy rose

Clematis The President? with a peachy rose

Clematis durundii

Clematis durundii

LWG Welcome

LWG Welcome

LWG Display Gardens

We were also privileged to spend a day at the nearby LWG Display Gardens directed by Klaus Korber.  We were treated like royalty–the staff readied and served great food and drink for us in the open-air greenhouse, and Klaus acted as MC, providing us with information about the gardens, their history, and his own love for clematis.  The gardens are chock full of many carefully grown — and well-labelled —  clematis, roses, and other perennials, as well as fruit and wine grapes.   Cherries were dripping off the trees, and we were invited to eat as many as we wanted and, omg, were they ever DELICIOUS!  I think I personally ate about a hundred.

Wonderful Table of Clematis Blossoms

Wonderful Table of Clematis Blossoms

But one of the best things that LWG did for us was to prepare a long  narrow table full of small glass bud vases, each containing one flower from one of the clematis blooming in the garden.  Throughout the afternoon at least a few of us were huddled around the table checking out the blooms.  We had great fun comparing and contrasting the clematis and, of course, testing each other on clematis identification!  Below are a few close-ups.  Which ones can YOU identify?

Can YOU identify this one?

Can YOU identify this one?

Or this one?

Or this one?

You've got some help with this one!

You’ve got some help with this one!

I will post Part 2 of my clematis trip to Europe very soon — stay tuned!!

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