Clematis of the Month, September 2013

Close-Up of Clematis florida sieboldii in September

Close-Up of Clematis florida sieboldii in September

The September show-off in my garden this year is Clematis florida sieboldii – the new one in my front garden.  As mentioned in my last post, the one growing  in a pot in the back garden for two years now has been so fabulous, always getting plenty of ohs and ahs from visitors, that I realized I just had to have one in the front garden, too. It bloomed beautifully in June, only a couple of months after going in the ground, then tested my mettle by dying all the way back to the ground.  Hrmph.  In August a new vine had poked its head up out of the ground and in September that one little vine outdid itself – blooming the entire month!
 
Clematis florida sieboldii gracing the front steps

Clematis florida sieboldii gracing the front steps

 

6 Comments

  1. Oren R. Segrest,Jr said,

    March 27, 2014 at 8:03 pm

    I wanted to talk about Clematis florida ‘Sieboldii’ but can’t reach you as
    a password is required and I am unable to get one because I do not have an account. I grow this cultivar here in central Mississippi and it provides me with great moments every spring, In fact, I noticed two blooms on it today.While web surfing this afternoon I found a group of pictures posted by “wikimedia” that were numerous photos of florida ‘Sieboldii” having
    different configurations of the beautiful blue/purple centers. Are these separate varieties or are they the result of cultural practices? Is it possible that one might be fortunate enough to obtain them?
    Any info you can provide would be most appreciated’

    Oren Segrest 1125 Lee Lane; Raymond, Ms 39154

    Like

    • March 28, 2014 at 5:57 pm

      Hi, Oren,

      Thanks for reading my blog!

      Oh, I’m so jealous that you already have blooms on your Clematis florida ‘Sieboldii’! This clematis, with its beautiful white tepals and rich purple boss, is a species clematis, often grown from seed. Because the seedlings can vary somewhat, there are in fact slightly different-looking versions of the plant. Surprisingly, Clematis florida ‘Floro Plena’, a creamy white version version with a greenish boss, shows up occasionally among Clematis f. Sieboldii seedlings. There is also another version, Clematis VIENNETTA ‘Evipo006’, which is either a hybrid or a selected seedling produced and introduced into commerce by Raymond Evison. The only plant source I could find in the US is Brushwood Nursery (also called Garden Vines): http://www.gardenvines.com/shop/large-flowered-clematis-3/clematis-florida-var-sieboldiana-420.html. I’ve gotten both mine there. I also notice that Thompson and Morgan seed company sells seeds.

      Laura

      Like

  2. April 1, 2014 at 11:53 am

    Laura, Oren here. Thank you so much , so very much for the info you provided relative to the Clematis florida sieboldii and the sport sieboldiana. You were most generous.
    Do you sell plants? I am looking forward to your “blog posting” I know they must be informative as well as interesting.
    Thanks again for your help hope to chat with you again.
    Oren

    Like

    • April 1, 2014 at 6:56 pm

      Thank you, Oren, for subscribing to Clematis in Seattle! To answer your question, I’m sorry, but I do not sell plants. I do, however, recommend several retail sources for clematis (I usually buy from all of them every year!) — check out “Great Sources for Clematis” in the left-hand column of my blog.

      Laura

      Like

  3. Patrick said,

    February 23, 2016 at 4:41 am

    Hi Laura ,
    It’s me, Patrick, again! I’m looking at your photo of Clematis florida sieboldii, and would love to know how it is being grown. Is it in a pot?
    Are those wooden stakes I see ? Would love to know. It’s lovely.

    Like

    • February 24, 2016 at 6:12 pm

      Patrick,

      That particular Clematis florida ‘Sieboldii’ is grown in the ground. I wind it around the metal porch rails, which are painted a light greenish yellow. I have another in a pot, for which I use interesting wavy and contorted branches pruned from a Cotinus (smoke bush) that I cut back hard every year–great effect.

      Laura

      Liked by 1 person


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: